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Tips and Tricks



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...or this photo fro Multi-family Birdhouse Kits








...or this photo for our nesting shelf and bird feeder kits







TIPS and TRICKS

KIT ASSEMBLY TIPS and TRICKS
BIRDHOUSE and FEEDER PLACEMENT
HANGING YOUR BIRDHOUSE or BIRD FEEDER
CLEANING OUT the BIRDHOUSE
BIRDHOUSE SIZING and ENTRANCE HOLE SIZES



** This birdhouse kit is not intended for children under six (6) years. **
/!\ WARNING: Choking Hazard – Small parts. (Nai
/!\ CAUTION: Always wear eye protection when using hammers and nails.


** KIT INSTRUCTIONS ARE PACKED WITH NAILS INSIDE YELLOW ENVELOPE  **
-  The small blocks/pieces of wood are perch blocks…not recommended for use.


-  First and foremost, make sure everyone involved with your project has and wears safety goggles. 


-  It may be best to study the sample house (if provided/ordered) and/or instruction sheet before assembly.  If you are conducting a class, assemble a kit to familiarize yourself with the process before you begin instruction.


-  Take extra special care to eliminate “blow-outs” when driving nails.  A “blow-out” is when the nail pokes through the side of the wood or comes near the surface causing the wood to dent or chip.  This can be minimized by ensuring nails are driven as straight as possible.  If a “blow-out” does occur, sometimes it may be better to “let it go.”  Often, attempting to fix the “blow-out” can do more harm than good.      


-  Our birdhouse kits are not pre-drilled; however, you will find that the nails easily penetrate the wood when coated with ordinary bar or soft soap (this coating minimizes splitting as well).  This works in the same fashion as the old carpenter’s “spit-on-the-nail” trick. (NEVER put nails in your mouth!) /!\ WARNING: Choking Hazard


-  We suggest that you “tack” or “start” the nails in the proper position before you place one piece on top of another.  This “tacking” helps hold the nails in place, thus allowing a free hand to hold the pieces steady.  


-  If you are concerned about splinters that may be along some edges of the wood, please don’t be.  These “splinters” are normal for soft or green (wet) rough-cut cedar. These can be knocked off by rubbing the pieces together, sanded off when dry, clipped off, or left intact for the birds to use as nest building material. 


-  If assembling a bargain kit and ready to drive a nail through the wood, try to locate a spot where there aren't any “knots.”  Driving nails into these “knots” may cause “nail bends” and subsequently cause the wood to split unnecessarily.  Keep in mind … nail locations need not be exact. 


-  If a piece of your kit does split, no need to worry, this is a birdhouse and more likely than not, will be placed outside (the birds won’t mind).  Just take the split pieces, put them back together like a puzzle and nail in place using an extra nail or two.


-  Depending on how many participants are involved with your project, it may be advisable to have Tylenol or some other type of headache remedy available (the pounding sound from 30 or so hammers can get to be real annoying after a while).


-  Have fun and thanks for choosing “The Birdhouse Depot.”

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BIRDHOUSE and FEEDER PLACEMENT 
Try to hang your house in a natural environment away from feeders.

If it gets extremely hot in the summer, face the hole north, or away from the sun. Also, regardless of where you live, try to place your house where it will get some shade for part of the day.

Place houses at least 15' away from one another (for territorial birds).

Stay somewhat close to the hole sizing/placement chart below. Although the chart varies in "Height Above Ground," we have found 6' to 10' works extremely well for all of the small to medium songbirds in the Pacific Northwest, as well as the Midwest. 

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HANGING YOUR BIRDHOUSE or BIRD FEEDER 
**Be careful and always wear appropriate safety equipment when using tools. 


For models with a "Flat" or "Flush" back:
Carefully drive a nail about 2-3 inches long into your tree, post, or other vertical wood surface and place the hole in the back of the house over the nail (some models have two holes).

Nail in tree

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For suspending models with an "Overhanging" roof panel:
A simple wire clothes hanger can be converted into a birdhouse hanger by first cliping off the bottom straight portion of the wire (some hangers have a cardboard rod here that can easily be removed). Then, with a pair of pliers and while wearing leather gloves, bend the ends of the hanger inside and up to form a sort of "fishhook" shape that the birdhouse roof/eaves will rest on. The same hanger-method will work if two "U" nails are driven into each end of the peak and the ends of the hanger are pushed through and bent around the "U" nail.  You can see an example of this on the "Carbon Birdhouse Kit"
 page of our online store.





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For surface mounting models with an "Overhanging" roof panel:
Place it wherever your heart desires, but please use some sort of bracket or adhesive to attach it to the object, so birds, squirrels, cats, and humans won't disturb any nesting birds. In some cases, first mounting a flat board to the top of a wooden post will assist by providing a larger surface for the house or feeder to rest on. Then you can drive a screw or nail up, through, and into the bottom of the house (don't go too far).

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CLEANING OUT the BIRDHOUSE 
After the young have left the nest is the time to clean the house. (It's possible, and common, to have more than one family use the home in the same season.)


For birdhouses that have removable panels, remove the screws, remove the panel and take out the nest.  Use a light bleach and water solution to rinse the inside of the house.  Replace the panel and screws and hang it up where it was. (It must have been a good location if you're taking out a nest.)


For houses that don't have a removable panel, take an ordinary metal clothes hanger and bend the hook narrow enough to fit through the entrance hole (Be really careful not to cut yourself and wear leather gloves).  Hold the birdhouse hole-side down, insert the hook end of the hanger, and "fish" out the nest.  Rinse and re-place as stated above. (This is much easier than it sounds.)

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Birdhouse Sizing/Entrance Hole Sizes 

The sizing information is provided to assist you in selecting an appropriate house and hole size. The sizes can be fudged a little, and the listed house size can be home to any other bird that fits and thinks it looks like a good place to live. Remember, not all birds are listed here.  If you need specific house information about a bird, contact us and we will try to help.

BIRD
TYPE
HOLE
SIZE
HEIGHT
ABOVE FLOOR
BOX SIZE
WxDxH
HEIGHT
ABOVE GROUND
Barn Swallow
1 open side
N/A
6 x 6 x 6
8-12'
Bluebird
1 1/2
6
5 x 5 x 8
5-10'
Chickadee
1 1/8
6
4 x 4 x 8
6-15'
Downy Woodpecker
1 1/4
6
4 x 4 x 10
6-20'
Flicker
2 1/2
14
7 x 7 x 16
6-20'
Flycatcher
2
6
6 x 6 x 8
8-20'
Nuthatch
1 1/4
6
4 x 4 x 8
12-20'
Phoebe
1 open side
N/A
6 x 6 x 6
8-12'
Purple Martin
2 1/2
2
6 x 6 x 6
10-15'
Red Headed Woodpecker
2
10
6 x 6 x 12
12-20'
Robin
1 open side
N/A
6 x 8 x 8
6-15'
Screech Owl
3
10
8 x 8 x 12
10-30'
Titmouse
1 1/4
6
4 x 4 x 8
6-15'
Tree Swallow
1 1/4
4
5 x 5 x 6
6-15'
Wood Duck
4
14
12 x 16 x 20
10-20'
Wren
1 1/4
6
4 x 4 x 6
6-10'

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